A Big Ol’ Pot of Jewish Chicken Soup Saves Any Day

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

A Big Ol’ Pot of Jewish Chicken Soup Saves Any Day

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I cook in rather large quantities for a living, but no matter who I am cooking for or why, I always aim to create flavor-intense layers. That often—in fact almost always—takes time. There are few hacks and shortcuts worth the compromise in taste. Even if the cooking time itself is quick, making good food simply takes some time. Time to think about what to make, time to shop, time to prep, and time to cook and clean up. I want to get the most out of my time, and I want you to, as well, so when it comes to making my chicken soup (my version of real-deal, old-fashioned Jewish bubbe-approved chicken soup that satisfies and lingers in memories), I know I will need some serious time. It’s not all… Read More

Sweets for Your Sweetie

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Sweets for Your Sweetie

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My favorite time of year will soon be upon us: Valentine’s Day! As someone who loves me some good chocolate, I always celebrate the opportunity to make something delicious. But a friend of mine shared with me a very sad fact: her husband (who loves dark chocolate, by the way) can’t eat it past mid-afternoon. He’s sensitive to the caffeine found in dark chocolate…and even to some milk chocolate these days. So I found the perfect “alternative chocolate” truffle—one that will meet all those important dietary restrictions, plus they are super-fun to make. These honeyed marzipan and date truffles rolled in toasted sesame seeds are a sweet little bit of heaven.

Soup for Supper

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Soup for Supper

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Winter’s been with us officially for only a couple of weeks now, but I’m already craving hearty, warming soups, chock full of savory vegetable goodness. I have a particular soft spot in my heart for soups that  satisfy my cravings without relying upon meat—I was a vegetarian for many years. This satisfying soup does it all and then some. It’s got an amazingly true corn flavor—in winter, no less!—due to the hominy (dried corn), plus lots of aromatic veggies and a sweet finish. Eat up, everyone! Winter is here.

Try Black-Eyed Peas for a Little New Year’s Good Luck

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Try Black-Eyed Peas for a Little New Year’s Good Luck

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My New Year’s menus always include black-eyed peas. I serve them for both New Year’s Day buffets on January first and for Jewish New Year in the fall. In both cases, black-eyed peas symbolize good luck and the wish for prosperity.  Across the southern states of the US, black-eyed peas are often cooked up with greens. In Sephardic and Mizrachi Jewish communities, black-eyed peas are served at the Rosh Hashanah seders. In ancient Persia they were served with long noodles in a soup. Hey, I’m not superstitious, but I’m happy to eat some foods that might give me good luck! Besides, black-eyed peas are also crazy healthy, cheap, and filling—all excellent for a post New Year’s Eve meal—which makes them a win-win. To all, please know that I wish you… Read More

Time to Make the Kugelhopf

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Time to Make the Kugelhopf

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Kugelhopf, or Gugelhopf, is a baked treat with Germanic roots. A cross between a yeast cake and a sweet enriched bread, it’s a cousin to the Italian holiday panettone. And it’s the subject of another Weiser Kitchen video. Some recipes for kugelhopf lean more toward cake-iness, some towards breadiness. Either way, these are traditionally baked in a pan with fanciful tall peaks and towers and sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar to mimic the snow-capped roofs of their home region. Around 1950, a group of Jewish immigrants in Minnesota reached out to a pan maker, Nordic Ware, in their search for the pan in which they could recreate this traditional treat. Nordic Ware created the now-famous Bundt pan with the iconic tube shape, which wasn’t quite as decorative, but worked well. The… Read More