For Peas’ Sake

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

For Peas’ Sake

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Not everyone loves those sweet baby globules of spring, but frankly, I can’t imagine why. My sister is a pea hater, unwilling to try even a bite of food that has peas in it. To me, my husband and my kids, peas are snappy, useful, charmers that work almost as well frozen as they do fresh from the garden. The trick is to use petite peas, so you reap all the sweetness you can per bite. Other than taste, here is why I am right and my sister is, ahem, wrong-a-roonie. Versatility: While I am singing the praises of baby peas, I must include how versatile they are. Fried into Indian-style patties, raw in slaw, whirled into soup, and served among other spring vegetables, they are the epitome of savory… Read More

Picnic Sandwich, Anyone?

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Picnic Sandwich, Anyone?

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Photo by Jerrelle Guy, courtesy of TheKitchn.com. When you are looking for a make-ahead lunch or dinner at the beach, at an outdoor music show, or for an outing at the park, a pan bagna (or pan bagnat) is one truly great choice that’s often overlooked. That’s a shame. It’s a Provençal specialty that’s a classic for good reason. I’m not usually the type to make traditional classics; I  get tempted to riff all the time. This dish is different. Trust me, the sandwich is so good, plus it has versatility built right in. Try it today—Bastille Day—or any time at all. Click through to my recipe on TheKitchn.com! Editor’s note: this post was prepared before we heard the terrible news from France. Our hearts go out to you, people of… Read More

Tabouli: When History and Taste Should Be the Only Things on the Menu

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

Tabouli: When History and Taste Should Be the Only Things on the Menu

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When I make tabouli and futz around with it, I think about its history. This salad of bulgur wheat, herbs, and tomatoes (also spelled tabbouleh) is deep and rich in history, but frankly, that history is usually either ignored or twisted for a political agenda. Tabouli, to me and as far as research can “prove,” is Lebanese. It may or may not actually be a singularly “Arab” food (as in Arab traders, invaders, or settlers who either invented it or brought it to the region), but it is most certainly widely eaten by Arabs throughout the Levant—Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Palestinian territories, and Jordan. It is a kissing cousin to a Turkish kisir, and other versions can also be found in Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean. It is a common food… Read More

A (Sort-of) Surprising Meeting of the Minds: Kian Lam Kho, Molly, and Me

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

A (Sort-of) Surprising Meeting of the Minds: Kian Lam Kho, Molly, and Me

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I was invited to a pre-conference gathering that took place right before the International Association of Culinary Professionals annual conference this past April. And I simply must, must, must share with you guys about the event and one very special person I met. The gathering was organized by Molly O’Neill (yes, the Molly O’Neill—that one, the iconic food writer, memoirist, historian, teacher, and—lucky for me—my mentor). At this educational event, I learned about true regional Chinese cooking from the charming, award-winning and revolutionary culinary thinker, teacher, and cookbook author, Kian Lam Kho. Kian deservedly went on to win IACP Cookbook Awards in two categories (Culinary Travel and the Julia Child First Book Award) a few days later. There were some other tremendously interesting people at the event. The incredible Irvin… Read More

A Last Father’s Day

The Weiser Kitchen™ — Tami Weiser

A Last Father’s Day

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We all have parents. Some of us are lucky enough to know they were pretty remarkable people.  I had that. Some of us are lucky enough to know that they were great contributors to society. I had that too. But only a few of us know, I mean genuinely know, that we were gifted in life with a devoted, supportive, kind father whose love knew no bounds. A man for whom nothing, and I mean nothing, was as absolute and infinite as his love for his children, grandchildren and wife. I was that lucky. So was my sister. In so many ways so was my husband, Bruce. Bruce was a son to my father, and my father a mentor, friend and companion to Bruce. We, all of us in my generation,… Read More